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NB This book is now in its SECOND EDITION - PLEASE GO TO THE FOLLOWING LINK to access this latest version, free of errors and typos! http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/1258870

For forty years Europe was divided into two opposing ideological blocks, participants in a global Cold War between communist East and capitalist West. Where these political enemies met, the eastern regimes built an elaborate Iron Curtain, outwardly aimed at protecting themselves from western invasion but in reality to keep their dissatisfied populations captive. Twenty years after revolution removed the communist rulers, what remains of the barriers they erected along Europe’s political faultline? Journalist and photographer Paul Kaye cycled 3,600 kilometres along the route of the Iron Curtain, from the Baltic to the Adriatic and around Berlin, to record the physical remnants of the divide and the thoughts of those that lived along it.

pavolk

About the Author

Paul Kaye
pavolk Brussels, Belgium

I am a Brit living and working in Brussels, currently as a translator, previously for a decade as an environment policy journalist. I now indulge my journalistic tendencies by crossing them with interests in history, travel and photography.

Comments (4) Write a comment

Poebunny

Poebunny says

This book is written with understanding and flair, uncovering echos of the divided past in the landscape and people of the Iron Curtain. The very interesting stories and wonderful photographs took me on a most fascinating and poignant journey.

posted at 02:13am Jan 06 PST

soulman1949

soulman1949 says

What a fascinating project! I am 60 years of age, the child of two Polish refugees who came to the UK after WW2, met here and married. I am a product, not just of the aftermath of WW2, but of the Cold War.

Because of my background, I was aware better than my classmates of what the Cold War was all about. My father would listen to the news in Polish from the BBC European Service, the Voice of America and Radio Free Europe. From a very early age I was aware of the attitude of the Communist regimes towards news broadcasts that han't been through the censor's pencil. They routinely jammed transmissions in Eastern Bloc languages from those broadcasters so that their own citizens could only hear the official "sanitised" version.

Imagine my horror, when in the summer of 1961, shortly after my eleventh birthday, I awoke to hear the news that, overnight the Eastern Gwrman regime had started erecting a wall to separate the East from the West. In the years that followed, we heard of countless East Germans shot dead while making their bid for freedom across the wall. Im the meantme, the Communist regime did what it could to fortify "The Wall" further to make such escape bids impossible.

I cried tears of joy that fateful November evening in 1989 when the crowds started to mass around the Wall - I couldn't believe the drama that unfolded as the evening progressed, culminating in pieces of the Wall being hacked off with pickaxes and the crowd eventually bursting through the barrier.

Thank you for bringing this story to life in a most human and interesting way. The photographs paint a fascinating picture that resonates greatly with me. I look forward to reading the book.

Thanks afgain.

Alan

posted at 09:03am Jan 05 PST

soulman1949

soulman1949 says

What a fascinating project! I am 60 years of age, the child of two Polish refugees who came to the UK after WW2, met here and married. I am a product, not just of the aftermath of WW2, but of the Cold War.

Because of my background, I was aware better than my classmates of what the Cold War was all about. My father would listen to the news in Polish from the BBC European Service, the Voice of America and Radio Free Europe. From a very early age I was aware of the attitude of the Communist regimes towards news broadcasts that han't been through the censor's pencil. They routinely jammed transmissions in Eastern Bloc languages from those broadcasters so that their own citizens could only hear the official "sanitised" version.

Imagine my horror, when in the summer of 1961, shortly after my eleventh birthday, I awoke to hear the news that, overnight the Eastern Gwrman regime had started erecting a wall to separate the East from the West. In the years that followed, we heard of countless East Germans shot dead while making their bid for freedom across the wall. Im the meantme, the Communist regime did what it could to fortify "The Wall" further to make such escape bids impossible.

I cried tears of joy that fateful November evening in 1989 when the crowds started to mass around the Wall - I couldn't believe the drama that unfolded as the evening progressed, culminating in pieces of the Wall being hacked off with pickaxes and the crowd eventually bursting through the barrier.

Thank you for bringing this story to life in a most human and interesting way. The photographs paint a fascinating picture that resonates greatly with me. I look forward to reading the book.

Thanks afgain.

Alan

posted at 09:03am Jan 05 PST

nickgibbs

nickgibbs says

Fantastic documentary of how the greatest story (possibly) of the perversity of global geopolitics affects local communities and landscapes. Oozing humanity - one man's journey and the reactions and sensations that went with it - it's poetry in print and photo.

posted at 11:59am Dec 08 PST

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