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Click to preview 12 Nazi Concentration Camps photo book

Motivated by a need to explore visually one of history’s most notorious periods, I traveled to Europe to photograph the Nazi concentration camps and subcamps in Austria (Mauthausen), Belgium (Fort Breendonk), Czechoslovakia, (Theresienstadt Ghetto), France (Natzweiler-Struthof), Germany (Bergen-Belsen, Bisingen, Dachau, Flossenbürg and Vaihingen an der Enz) and Poland (Auschwitz-Birkenau, Majdanek and Treblinka). I chose to use an 8” x 10” view camera and color film making my pictures counterpoints to the historical black and white photographs and films which
documented the Holocaust.

jimfriedman

About the Author

jimfriedman
jimfriedman

Comments (13)

pxlfxr

pxlfxr says

Mr. Friedman certainly has a eye. What truly impresses first that he hauled an 8x10 camera a film all around to accomplish this project as a young man. Second are the feelings and mental pictures that these photos evoke. Taking moments of study on each image, each one told a story different that what the history books do. I felt the people, the humanity. If the subject was a part of your family history it is a must have and for others a should have for students of photography a treasure as well.

posted at 09:45am Dec 15 PST

joemasica

joemasica says

The poncho is a flimsy protection against any real storm, and distinctly touristy as well- this is evocative of the holocaust because the worlds explanations as to why this could have happened and why nobody stopped it earlier are equally thin and flimsy. IBM sold the nazis ‘database’ technology, and the world only really reacted when Hitler got greedy and took France. Until then, then we were willing to spectate and make money- which is eerily complicit sounding. The methodical murder of 6 million people is a horror from which their is no protection, no explanation, no words to describe it.
Which is why Freedman's photographs, being preverbal, are direct and haunting images which, I believe, search for a truth about the holocaust that lays deeper than our words can convey. Particularly evocative for me are the pages 17 and 24, which I could see as a diptych- The quiet resilience and dignity of the survivor, contrasted with the slightly faded banal face of evil, are icons whose impact lays deep within the human psyche.

posted at 03:20pm Sep 16 PST

kimjfri

kimjfri says

Friedman is one of the most talented photographers whose work I have had the pleasure of viewing. His work is beautiful, disturbing, thought provoking, challenging and brilliant.

posted at 04:18pm Aug 20 PST

ankerbell

ankerbell says

Evocative. Powerful. Transformative. A haunting bridge to the past.

posted at 03:59am Aug 19 PST

ESapi

ESapi says

This book is a collection of truly powerful photos. Friedman does an amazing job recapturing one of the most unforgettable moments in history through art.

posted at 08:45pm Aug 18 PST

mgtuttle

mgtuttle says

I saw this work in the 1980's and believe that there still hasn't been anything like it presented in the last 26 years. Perhaps the cover strikes some as garish, but it certainly is a good symbolic introduction to the garish theater at some of the concentration camps that the Nazis created for the consumption of outside world. Friedman's day-glo 'uniform', the color shown again on the side of a touring bus paused after it has delivered its occupants to a camp, someone seemingly beckoning him onto the bus; these cues hint at possible parallels of experience. These camps, these people, are recorded by the same basic photographic process that was used in the 1930's and 40's, from scrapbook snapshots by Nazi officers to propagandists to the Allied news photographers that followed, and yet with the heavy vignetting of the image circle, the tilting of the sharpness, and the messages left on the camera bed there are hints that suggest multiple layers of communicating the photographer's experience. The color of a cloudy day is transformed by the 8"x10" film to bright hues belying the implied horror to come, distracting the viewer much in the way that new inmates might have been greeted by a prisoner orchestra playing classical music before they realized what was to come. There are many whispers.

posted at 04:37pm Aug 18 PST

waywitty

waywitty says

I meant to say I will buy this book to keep and share with my children, and theirs.

posted at 07:14pm Aug 17 PST

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