How to get reviews on Amazon once you’ve launched your book | Blurb Blog

How to get reviews on Amazon once you’ve launched your book
16 Jul 2014

How to get reviews on Amazon once you’ve launched your book

Writing a book is hard work. As is marketing that book before and after launch. But when you distribute your book through Amazon, getting reviews may be the single most important thing to determine your book’s future success. There’s no secret formula, and no one way to garner the most reviews, but with a little research, a lot of patience, and a ton of outreach, those coveted reviews are but an email away.

Ask your existing readers or fan base

Whether you maintain a strong social media following, belong to many writing groups, or already have built-in readers from a previous book launch, your existing fans are your bread and butter. Since they already have an appreciation for you and your work, you are one step closer to converting them from fans to reviewers.

Now since they are already invested in you to a degree, they are also the best people to ask for a genuine review, the ones who buy your book on Amazon and review it. How do you get them to do this? Compose a strong email to them appealing to their passion for and knowledge of your genre, as well as their previous interest in your work. For some, that will be enough to pique their interest. For others, you may want to offer to supply them with the book for free. This way you are getting genuine reviews since the books were purchased through the site, but you haven’t required them to buy your book to do so.

Contact Amazon’s top reviewers

The top reviewers for Amazon have earned their status for a reason; they review everything from books to electronics, and other consumers rank their reviews as useful. While you might assume these reviewers are out of your reach—after all, they likely receive hundreds of requests a day—they are still worth contacting. Even if only a few end up reviewing your book, their reviews could make all the difference.

  • To get started, decide how many reviews you are hoping to get. If you have your eye set on 25, you’ll want to reach out to at least 100 reviewers.
  • Take a look through the list of Amazon’s top reviewers, and create a spreadsheet where you can start logging info about your potential reviewers. You are looking for reviewers who have already reviewed books in your genre, and once you’ve found them, any additional information you can grab about them, including email addresses, and any personal interests.
  • Now, the art of the pitch. Spend time crafting a pitch letter that succinctly tells a brief summary of your book, why you’d like the specific reviewer to read it, and how you’d like to offer them a free copy. Include references to similar books they’ve already reviewed so they realize you have done your homework and it is not a blind request. If this seems too time consuming, create a boilerplate review request with highlighted fields for personalization, such as their name, and recent books they’ve reviewed. This way, you can update the highlighted fields to quickly personalize your pitch request for each reviewer.
  • Follow-up is key. Every time you reach out to a reviewer, add the date to your excel spreadsheet so you can keep track of when you sent your letter, who says yes, who says no, and who never replies. Follow up two weeks after your initial request with a friendly and simple message asking if they have had a chance to read through your request and that you look forward to hearing back.
  • 5. Close the deal. For those reviewers who do respond, make sure you are providing them with what they need (additional biographical info on you, previous works, whatever) and that you are timely in your communications back to them.

Get in touch with the book blogger community

Book bloggers have the uncanny ability to passionately and tirelessly spread the word about their views—and reviews. Unfortunately, many review books on their personal websites and blogs, and not all are posting those reviews (or variations thereof) on Amazon. But don’t let that stop you.

  • Start by looking for bloggers who review titles in your genre. You can start with Google. If you’re writing a thriller, type thriller + book blogger into the search field and see what comes up.
  • Next, go through the book blogger directories for WordPress and Blogmetrics.
  • Just like with the Amazon top reviewers, you are looking to create a short list of reviewers who favor your genre, and who will welcome relevant pitches.
  • Once you’ve got your list, go back to the boilerplate form letter you were using for the Amazon top reviewers. Tweak it a little, making sure to reference things spotted on the blogger’s pages, and adding any commonalities. Email them (if contact info is available on their site) or use the contact form on their site if available.
  • As above, be professional in your follow-up activities.

While soliciting reviews can seem to take a lot of time and effort, their value cannot be underestimated. Reviews immediately add credibility to your book, communicating to potential customers that it is a worthy read. They also improve your book’s ranking when consumers are searching on Amazon, which is the primary reason to stay committed to getting reviews. If you’re able to move your title into earlier search pages, you’ll be discovered by readers who wouldn’t otherwise find you. And that, hopefully, will translate into more book sales.


Milena Canizares

Milena’s a Canadian writer who lives in San Francisco. She’s passionate about writers, books, and getting good ideas off the ground. Her work has appeared in Marie Claire and The Globe and Mail, amongst others. When not writing or editing, you can find her traveling around Europe or exploring the Bay Area. She’s addicted to diet coke, obsessed with sushi, and takes way too many pictures of clouds.

  • Shilpi C

    Very helpful article indeed. Amazon reviews definitely influence the purchasing decision.

    • Very helpful article indeed. +2

      • Once you’ve got your list, go back to the boilerplate form letter you were using for the Amazon top reviewers. Tweak it a little, making sure to reference things spotted on the blogger’s pages, and adding any commonalities. Email them (if contact info is available on their site) or use the contact form on their site if available.

  • marymemmons

    I tried this with some success, but only got 10% or less who actually reviewed the book. For the most part, it was a successful effort as I got realistic reviews and many people did like the book. BUT, there are some wild and crazy folks out there who do things like complain that on page ten you used the word rouge and they don’t like that word. Or who find two grammar mistakes and claim it makes the book unreadable and so they give you a 2 star review. That’s okay, because that is the person’s honest opinion, but I finally got tired of these folks, and of the folks who took a free copy and then had not reviewed the book six months later. I am going to give up on this self-publishing thing, though I admit it has been fun.

    • The top reviewers for Amazon have earned their status for a reason; they review everything from books to electronics, and other consumers rank their reviews as useful. While you might assume these reviewers are out of your reach—after all, they likely receive hundreds of requests a day—they are still worth contacting. Even if only a few end up reviewing your book, their reviews could make all the difference.

    • rekar buchi

      how about a review exchange

    • Simon Chapman

      Self-publishing is the most unrewarding soul crushing experience! LOL! I would recommend self-publishing to my enemies as a way to destroy them. Unless you plan to write short stories and not commit too much time to writing, marketing, promoting, etc – STAY AWAY FROM SELF-PUBLISHING!!!
      Lucky for me, I have no soul and I will sacrifice a goat to Odin, to smite everyone of those book-thieves who didn’t even bother to rate the book, let alone review it.

  • I dislike those reviewers who would make good micro managers, focusing on things like repeated word usage and misspelled words INSTEAD OF focusing on the big picture. As a reviewer I would be looking for signs of genius.

  • Albert Norton

    Very useful article. Making a platform is not easy. Will be following this approach pretty closely to get a few more reviews for my old and upcoming books.

  • Ricardo Prado

    Hi. I published my book “The Hidden Eagles” with A https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d12abf7795140be2aa687479e5b375ff624513524c63ac27bd661e3ec623d4e5.jpg mazon last year. I’m trying to get in touch with these reviewers, but don’t see any contact information on the reviewers list. How do I contact them? My book deals with the way we see the american military establishment in Latin America, specificaly in my country of Panama. The message of this book is to make people realize that americans are not just soldiers carrying guns. Thank you.

    • rekar buchi

      how about a review exchange for book

  • Frederick Amina

    Hi ive just written my book called Goodness and Mercy under Frederick Amina at Amazon book’s. If anyone is looking for a good read this is the book to read. This is the book it’s about alcoholism divorce drug addiction bitterness anger hatred and jealousy forgiveness unforgiveness anxiety poverty fear worry love happiness death suicide lost of a loved one Redemption and so much more all in one book. Thanks

  • Παναγιώτης Σοφιανόπουλος

    Hello,
    I published my book HERETIC INVESTOR about a year ago. Still no review. And I really, cannot get in touch with these amazon’s reviewers. Any idea how to contact them?

    My book is on Investing. It demonstrates like its subtitle says: A work smart, not hard, way to profit on Wall Street.

    Additionaly if some reviewer is interested in the topic of investment and sees this post, I can send her/him a free copy of my book in pdf to read it and review it on amazon.
    If you’re interested mail me at: sofpan at yahoo dot com.
    Thank you,
    Panayotis https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/44a7e5eb8ba7991e44fa0d95f9e11133f59e8e3fb74f3d5f809ab6c699496dd9.jpg

    • Khalid_abdullah_khan

      Hi Panayotis,
      I am in personal finance and investment. I would like to review your book.
      Khalid A. Khan

  • John Johnson

    How do you get in touch with Amazon reviewers??

    • rekar buchi

      want a review ..?? get in touch with me

  • Philip Mann

    I have the same question that others here do. I looked at the page of Amazon reviewers, and while they all sound like wonderful people, there is no contact information. It sounds like ” Don’t call us, we’ll call you.”
    I’m also on Goodreads, and ran a giveaway program back in January, which garnered me three reviews for thirty books given away. One of them trashed the book, too.
    As for contacts, or followers, you can hint, cajole, plead all you want. It isn’t easy getting somebody to buy, let alone review a book.
    There is no easy way.